© 2023 by Philadelphia Eagles Frenzy.

Not Affiliated with the National Football League or the Philadelphia Eagles.

The 100 Greatest Eagles in Franchise History

This year the NFL is celebrating its 100th year of operation. The Eagles were started in 1933, so they haven’t been around for the entire tenure of the NFL. Still, in their 86 years of playing football they have had plenty of great players and Hall of Famers wear their green, white and black jerseys. The following list will rank the top 100 players in Eagles history. They were measured by how long their tenures were with the team, and what they accomplished while in Philadelphia. Without further ado, here are the *unquestioned 100 greatest players in Philadelphia Eagles history.

*you’re probably gonna yell at me about where some players are ranked/not ranked.

100) CB Asante Samuel (2008-2011)

Stats as an Eagle: 56 games, 23 INTs, 3 fumble recoveries, 2 TD

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler


Samuel was a true ballhawk in his time with the Eagles. In just 56 games, he intercepted the 11th-most passes in franchise history (every player in front of him has played in at least eight more games). The additions of Nnamdi Asomugha and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie forced Samuel out of Philadelphia early, but if he had stayed a little longer he was sure to add a few more picks and climb up the franchise's all-time interceptions list a little more.


99) G Evan Mathis (2011-2014)

Stats as an Eagle: 56 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


The dream team offseason of 2011 was a disaster with the additions of Nnamdi Asomugha, Vince Young, Ronnie Brown, Cullen Jenkins, and Jason Babin that all turned out as failures. However, one signing that salvaged that offseason from being a complete embarrassment was the low-key signing of Evan Mathis. Mathis struggled to find a home in the NFL until he signed with Philadelphia. All of a sudden things clicked, and he was considered one of the best guards in the league throughout his tenure. In his four years as a starter for the Eagles, Pro Football Focus ranked him in the top-five of guard play every season (2011-1st, 2012-1st, 2013-1st, 2014-3rd). Chip Kelly booted him out a door and he was able to land in Denver where he won a Super Bowl with the Broncos before he retired. He now plays competitive poker in his free time.


98) RB Ricky Watters (1995-1997)

Stats as an Eagle: 48 games, 3,794 rushing yards, 31 rush TDs, 161 receptions, 1,318 receiving yards, 1 rec TD; 5,112 scrimmage yards, 32 total TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler


All Eagles fans remember him for his famous phrase uttered after his first game as an Eagle “For who? For what?” which made fans sour on him. Watters went on to play extremely well for the team after that bad first impression. He never missed a game in his three-year tenure as an Eagle, and was a threat as both a runner and a receiver.


97) DL Marion Campbell (1956-1961)

Stats as an Eagle: 71 games, 2 INTs, 8 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, NFL Champion (1960)


Campbell was a versatile defensive lineman who helped the Eagles beat Vince Lombardi’s Green Bay Packers in 1960. Sacks weren’t recorded back then so we’ll never be able to measure his true impact, but his 2 interceptions and 8 fumble recoveries showed he was always around the ball and in the right place at the right time.


96) DT Floyd Peters (1964-1969)

Stats as an Eagle: 70 games, 2 INTs, 3 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler


Another player who we can’t really measure too finely because of his era, but in six years with the Birds he made three Pro Bowls. The only other defensive tackle in team history with more Pro Bowl berths is Fletcher Cox.


95) WR Ben Hawkins (1966-1973)

Stats as an Eagle: 102 games, 261 receptions, 4,764 receiving yards, 32 rec TDs

Accolades: N/A


Hawkins helped transcend the Eagles’ passing game back when passing wasn’t really dominant. In 1967 he led the NFL in receiving yards and established himself as one of the better receivers in the league. He remained in Philadelphia a long time, playing in every game possible for seven straight years. His consistency for such a long time is what puts him on this list.


94) DE Greg Brown (1981-1986)

Stats as an Eagle: 89 games, 50.5 sacks, 7 fumble recoveries, 1 safety

Accolades: N/A


The mid-80’s was Brown’s time to shine. He recorded nearly 30 sacks over the course of two seasons in 1984 and 1985. His dominance back still shows today, as his 50.5 sacks as an Eagle are the 5th-most in franchise history.


93) LB Byron Evans (1987-1994)

Stats as an Eagle: 113 games, 806 tackles, 3.5 sacks, 3 forced fumbles, 6 fumble recoveries, 13 INTs, 1 touchdown

Accolades: N/A


Evans spent his entire eight year career with the Eagles. He was in the center of the team’s dominant late 80’s-early 90’s Buddy Ryan defense. In 1992 he led the entire NFL in tackles. The team hasn’t honored him yet in their Hall of Fame, but he should be enshrined at some point.


92) DT Ken Clarke (1978-1987)

Stats as an Eagle: 148 games, 32.5 sacks, 8 fumble recoveries, 1 safety

Accolades: N/A


The NFL didn’t start registering sacks until 1982, which was four years after Clarke’s career started. Clarke finished with 32.5 sacks as an Eagle, which are the 13th-most in franchise history. There’s no way of knowing how many sacks Clarke really did have in his full-time with the Eagles, but he’d most definitely be higher on the franchise sacks list. He was also a part of the 1980 Eagles that was one game away from bringing the team’s first Super Bowl trophy home.


91) CB Irv Cross (1961-1966; 1969)

Stats as an Eagle: 83 games, 16 INTs, 9 fumble recoveries, 1 TD

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler


Even after suffering tons of concussions, Cross only missed one game in his six year career in Philadelphia. He also was able to intercept at least one pass in each season with the Birds. There seemed to be some drama in the Eagles locker room in the mid 1960s, as Cross threatened to quit football if he wasn’t traded (linebacker Maxie Baughan also demanded a trade). He spent three years in Los Angeles then returned to the Eagles in 1969 for one final season. If he would have spent his entire career in Philadelphia he’d be much higher on this list.

90) RB Tom Woodeshick (1963-1971)

Stats as an Eagle: 111 games, 3,563 rushing yards, 21 rush TDs, 126 receptions, 1,175 receiving yards, 6 rec TDs; 4,736 scrimmage yards, 27 total TDs

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Woodeshick spent nine seasons in Eagles green, and was consistently good throughout his tenure. He spent his first four seasons in the team only playing sparingly, but in 1967 he got his big break and took advantage of it. The following season he was selected to his only Pro Bowl. He has the 9th-most rushing yards in franchise history.


89) RB Duce Staley (1997-2003)

Stats as an Eagle: 98 games, 4,807 rushing yards, 22 rush TDs, 2,498 receiving yards, 10 rec TDs; 7,305 scrimmage yards, 32 total TDs

Accolades: N/A


DUUUUUUUCE! Staley has always been a fan favorite in Philadelphia. He recorded three 1000 yard rushing seasons as an Eagle, and his 4,800 total rushing yards still have him in the top-5 in Eagles franchise history. His most memorable moment as an Eagle was probably The Pickle Juice Game, when he rushed for 200 yards and added 61 yards as a receiver in a dominant win over the Dallas Cowboys.


88) FB/TE Keith Byars (1986-1992)

Stats as an Eagle: 105 games, 2,672 rushing yards, 17 rush TD, 371 receptions, 3,532 receiving yards, 13 rec TDs; 6,204 scrimmage yards, 30 total TDs

Accolades: Eagles’ 75th Anniversary Team


Byars was an offensive weapon for the Randall Cunningham-era Eagles. He lined up in virtually every skill position on offense, even throwing six touchdowns in his career (four of those touchdowns coming in 1990 alone). He has the 7th-most receptions, 13th-most rushing yards and 16th-most receiving yards in Eagles history.


87) WR Calvin Williams (1990-1996)

Stats as an Eagle: 93 games, 295 receptions, 3,840 receiving yards, 34 rec TDs

Accolades: N/A


Williams was a consistent wide receiver for Randall Cunningham in the 90s. He never really had any eye-popping reception or receiving yard numbers, but the man knew how to cross pay dirt. His 34 receiving touchdowns are still the 8th-most in Eagles history.


86) G/T Wade Key (1970-1979)

Stats as an Eagle: 121 games

Accolades: Eagles’ 75th Anniversary Team


Key was a valuable and versatile lineman for the Eagles in the 1970s. He spent his entire 10 year career with the Eagles, playing both left guard and left tackle. He is one of only 40 players ever to play 120+ games in an Eagles uniform.


85) DT Corey Simon (2000-2004)

Stats as an Eagle: 78 games, 32 sacks, 210 tackles, 9 forced fumbles, 3 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Simon’s time in Philadelphia didn’t last that long, but in his five years as an Eagle he was a force in the middle of the defense. His 32 sacks are the 4th-most by an interior defensive lineman in team history. He will always be remembered as being apart of that legendary 2004 Jim Johnson defense that almost tasted Super Bowl glory.


84) RB Darren Sproles (2014-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 55 games, 1,265 rushing yards, 12 rush TDs, 169 receptions, 1,435 receiving yards, 5 rec TDs, 6,718 all-purpose yards, 21 total TDs

Accolades: 3 Pro Bowler, Super Bowl LII Champion


In the conversation for one of the best trades in Eagles history is the team acquiring Sproles from the New Orleans Saints for a 5th-round pick (who turned out to be Ronald Powell, who is no longer in the NFL). For the past five season Sproles has helped the Eagles in the running game, receiving game and on special teams. He is currently tied for the most punt return touchdowns in franchise history, and has the 3rd-most punt return yards (and has a very good chance of leaping up to 1st if he stays healthy in 2019). He was able to earn a Super Bowl ring in 2017 while standing on the sidelines, and he returns for one final season trying to earn another one, but this time on the field. If he is able to help the Eagles make a deep playoff tun in 2019 he will likely climb higher on the list.


83) LB Jerry Robinson (1979-1984)

Stats as an Eagle: 87 games, 6 INTs, 11 fumble recoveries, 3 sacks, 1 defensive TD

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


He’s known more for his time as a Raider, but Robinson had a successful start of his career with the Eagles. He was able to contribute in many different ways with his interceptions, sacks and fumble recoveries. If he stayed in green his whole career, we are likely talking about a top-30 player in franchise history.


82) WR Jeremy Maclin (2009-2014)

Stats as an Eagle: 75 games, 343 receptions, 4,771 receiving yards, 36 rec TDs

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Maclin has been one of the Eagles’ best 1st-round pick in recent memory. He helped the Eagles give Donovan McNabb a good receiver finally right before the were kicking him out the door one season later. Maclin excelled with Michael Vick under center, becoming a Pro Bowl caliber receiving option. He could have stayed here even longer, but ultimately chose to reject Chip Kelly’s long-term offer and head back his hometown Kansas City Chiefs. He has the 10th-most receiving yards and receptions in franchise history, while also catching the 7th-most touchdowns in the Eagles’ 86 year history.


81) WR Terrell Owens (2004-2005)

Stats as an Eagle: 21 games,124 receptions, 1,963 receiving yards, 20 rec TDs

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


It is amazing to look back at how much production Terrell Owens gave the Eagles on the field in the short time he was here. It is also fascinating to look back at how much destruction Terrell Owens caused the Eagles in his short time here. You either lover him or hate him, but either way Owens undeniably had the greatest short-term production of an Eagles player ever. On a broken leg he almost single-handedly won the Eagles their first ever Super Bowl title. The McNabb-Owens duo would have been one of the best quarterback-wide receiver duo in football history if they could have just got along. What could have been….

80) S Michael Lewis (2002-2006)

Stats as an Eagle: 76 games, 9 INTs, 386 tackles, 10 forced fumbles, 6 fumble recoveries, 6 sacks

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Lewis was a fantastic complement to Brian Dawkins in Jim Johnson’s defense. Johnson allowed both of his safeties to move all over the field, and even blitz the quarterback. Lewis not only successfully got the the quarterback in his career, but he also hit hard enough to cause double-digit fumbles and had the ability to pick off deep passes.


79) LB John Bunting (1972-1982)

Stats as an Eagle: 132 games, 8 INTs, 6 fumble recoveries

Accolades: N/A


Bunting was an Eagle for life, playing his entire 11-year career in kelly green. He is one of only 25 players to play in 130+ games in an Eagles uniform. He never made any Pro Bowls, but Bunting was an overall solid player, recording 8 interceptions and 6 fumble recoveries in his career.


78) G Shawn Andrews (2004-2008)

Stats as an Eagle: 50 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


Andrews only played 50 games in midnight green, but his presence was felt when he was on the field. In just five seasons he became a Pro Bowler twice and was All-Pro once. Things went downhill for him when depression hit him and other personal issues. The Eagles signed his brother Stacy to try and help him get through his personal matters but the move ended up not being successful, and he was released in 2010.


77) TE Chad Lewis (1997-2005)

Stats as an Eagle: 110 games, 228 receptions, 2,349 receiving yards, 23 rec TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler


Most remembered for his two touchdown performance in the 2004 NFC Championship Game (breaking his foot on the 2nd touchdown), Lewis was a consistently reliable receiving option for Donovan McNabb. His three consecutive Pro Bowl selections proved that for a short period of time he was among the best tight ends in the entire NFC.


76) G Jermane Mayberry (1996-2004)

Stats as an Eagle: 112 games

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Mayberry was a versatile and reliable lineman for the Eagles, playing every offensive line position except for center in his nine year Philadelphia career. His great play up front allowed Donovan McNabb to develop into a star in the early 2000s. He put the team first in 2004 when he played both guard positions when needed during the team’s Super Bowl run.


75) TE Brent Celek (2007-2017)

Stats as an Eagle: 175 games, 398 receptions, 4,998 receiving yards, 31 rec TDs

Accolades: Super Bowl LII Champion


In his 11 year career with the Eagles, Celek only missed one game out of a possible 176 games (and that was only because the concussion protocol didn’t allow him to get cleared in time for a Thursday night game). Celek has gone down in history as being the only Eagle to spent his entire career with the team and retire as a reigning Super Bowl champion. He was offered a contract by the Dallas Cowboys after the Eagle initially cut him, and decided he would rather retire then spend a minute as a Cowboy (which also makes him a legend). Celek currently has the 5th-most receptions, 8th-most receiving yards, and 11th-most receiving touchdowns in Eagles history. His 175 games in midnight green are also the 4th-most, behind only Harold Carmichael, Brian Dawkins and David Akers.


74) WR Fred Barnett (1990-1995)

Stats as an Eagle: 81 games, 308 receptions, 4,634 receiving yards, 28 rec TDs

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


“Arkansas Fred” teamed up with Calvin Williams to give Randall Cunningham a dynamic receiving duo in the 90s. He is best remembered for being on the receiving end of Cunningham’s hail mary pass from the Eagles’ own endzone and catching/running the ball the rest of the way for one of the craziest plays in franchise history. He currently sits in Eagles annals with the 12th-most receptions and receiving yards, as well as the 15th-most receiving touchdowns.


73) G Brandon Brooks (2016-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 46 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Super Bowl LII Champion


In the offseason leading into the 2016 campaign, the Eagles were in desperate need of a dominant guard. They took a leap of faith and signed Brandon Brooks to a five-year, $40 Million deal. His play was solid early on, but anxiety issues put his future as an Eagle hanging in the balance. Brooks was able to get the help he needed to want to continue his NFL career, and the following season he helped the Eagles to their first ever Lombardi Trophy. He has now put up back-to-back Pro Bowl seasons and is regarded as one of the best guards in the entire NFL. Currently recovering from a torn achilles, Brooks is ready to pick up where he left off and rack up some more Pro Bowls and continue being one of the best players in Eagles history.


72) CB Roynell Young (1980-1988)

Stats as an Eagle: 117 games, 23 INTs, 4 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Young played his entire nine-year career as an Eagle. His 23 interceptions are the 12th-most in team history. During his tenure in the league, only six other cornerbacks recorded as many starts and interceptions as Young.


71) WR Irving Fryar (1996-1998)

Stats as an Eagle: 48 games, 222 receptions, 3,067 receiving yards, 19 rec TDs

Accolades: N/A


He was only an Eagle for three seasons, but Fryar was downright dominant in those seasons. In fact, it’s still considered such a dominant run that he is in the top-25 for all three major receiving categories in Eagles history. He’s the oldest player in Eagles history to record 1,000 receiving yards in a season, and holds holds the NFL record for most receiving yards (1,316 in 1997) by a 35+ old player.

70) OL Todd Herremans (2005-2014)

Stats as an Eagle: 127 games, 2 rec TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler


Herremans was one of the most versatile offensive lineman the Eagles have ever had. He played (successfully) at four out of a possible five positions (never played center). Not only was he a great offensive lineman for the Eagles, he was also their sneaky offensive weapon, as he recorded two touchdown catches when reporting as an eligible receiver.


69) DE William Fuller (1994-1996)

Stats as an Eagle: 46 games, 35.5 sacks, 12 forced fumbles, 3 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler


Fuller is in the same category as Fryar: only here for a short time but dominated in his three years as an Eagle. He made the Pro Bowl in all three seasons in Philadelphia, and his 35.5 sacks still sits as the 10th-most in franchise history.


68) LB Frank LeMaster (1974-1982)

Stats as an Eagle: 129 games, 10 INTs, 7 fumble recoveries, 3 TDs

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


LeMaster is another Eagles-lifer, spending all nine seasons as a pro in Philadelphia. He never missed a game, playing all 129 possible contests before retiring. Only three linebackers have played in more games as an Eagle (John Bunting, William Thomas and Chuck Bednark).


67) TE Charle Young (1973-1976)

Stats as an Eagle: 56 games, 197 receptions, 2,583 receiving yards, 12 rec TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 1x 1st-team All-Pro


The Eagles drafted Young in 1973 and he made an immediate impact, playing well enough to make three straight Pro Bowls and an All-Pro team. He would have been one of the best tight ends in team history if he hung around longer, but the team decided to trade him for an unaccomplished, young quarterback named Ron Jaworski.


66) S Quintin Mikell (2003-2010)

Stats as an Eagle: 123 games, 10 INTs, 444 tackles, 7 forced fumbles, 7 fumble recoveries, 1 TD

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


Mikell was a great compliment next to Brian Dawkins towards the end of Dawkins’ time in Philadelphia. He started out as an undrafted free agent and worked his way up from special teams work to earn a role on defense (his big field goal block that led to a touchdown was his most significant play as an Eagle). Only four safeties have played in more games in an Eagles uniform than Mikell.


65) S Randy Logan (1973-1983)

Stats as an Eagle: 159 games, 23 INTs, 5 fumble recoveries

Accolades: N/A


Logan locked up the Eagles defensive backfield from the mid-70’s to the mid-80’s, never missing a game in his entire 11-year Eagles career. His 159 consecutive games played streak trails only Harold Carmichael in Eagles franchise history. He never made any Pro Bowls to get himself known nationally, but his 23 career interceptions are the 10th-most in franchise history.


64) CB Lito Sheppard (2002-2008)

Stats as an Eagle: 93 games, 18 INTs, 460 return yards, 3 TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


Sheppard was part of a legendary 2002 draft class for the Eagles that included Michael Lewis, Sheldon Brown and Brian Westbrook. Sheppard and Brown teamed up to be one of the best cornerback duos the franchise has ever had. His three career defensive touchdowns are tied for the 3rd-most in Eagles history, and two of them coming against the Cowboys certainly added to his legacy.


63) CB Sheldon Brown (2002-2009)

Stats as an Eagle: 128 games, 19 INTs, 431 tackles, 7 forced fumbles, 2 fumble recoveries, 7 sacks

Accolades: N/A


Of course Brown will come in right now to his fellow draft classmate and corner Lito Sheppard, as they teamed up to become a fearful duo under Jim Johnson’s defense. Brown was the more impactful hitter, as he is most remembered for laying down monstrous hits on the likes of Steven Jackson and Reggie Bush. Brown also got to the quarterback fairly often for a cornerback, as no other cornerback in Eagles history has more sacks than him. He also has played the second most games of any cornerback in team history, behind only Herm Edwards.


62) LT/DT Vic Sears (1941-1953)

Stats as an Eagle: 131 games, 11 fumble recoveries, 1 TD

Accolades: 2x NFL Champion (1948, 1949), NFL 1940s All-Decade Team


Sears was a contributor both on offense and defense for the 1949 and 1949 Eagles championship teams. His play in the late 1940’s led to him being named to the league’s All-Decade team of the 40’s. With 131 games played in an Eagles uniform, he currently sits in 25th place for the most games played in Eagles history.


61) CB Bobby Taylor (1995-2002)

Stats as an Eagle: 119 games, 19 INTs, 368 tackles, 5 forced fumbles, 11 fumble recoveries, 4 sacks

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler


The duo of Bobby Taylor and Troy Vincent made offensive coordinators adjust their strategies heavily, as the two created a no fly zone. Taylor’s 119 games are the 3rd-most played by a cornerback in Eagles history. He never really had a breakout that caused him to be recognized as one of the best cornerbacks in the league, but his consistency and longevity makes him one of the best Eagles cornerbacks ever.

60) C Guy Morriss (1973-1983)

Stats as an Eagle: 158 games

Accolades: N/A


Morriss spent 11 seasons in Philadelphia, only missing one game due to injury. His 158 games played are the 9th-most in franchise history, and has the 2nd-most games played by an Eagles center (behind only Chuck Bednarik). In fact, only five centers in the history of the league had started more games, so you know his availability is what made him such an impact player in the league.


59) CB Herman Edwards (1977-1985)

Stats as an Eagle: 135 games, 33 INTs, 6 fumble recoveries, 2 TDs

Accolades: N/A


Edwards played the most games of an Eagles cornerback in franchise history, and was a stalwart of the Eagles’ defenses of the late 1970’s-early 1980’s. Of course playing in all of those games meant that he had to pick off a few passes, and his 33 interceptions in an Eagles uniform are the 4th-most in franchise history. He is most famously remembered for picking up the fumble against the Giants that is now referred to as the Miracle at the Meadowlands.



58) OT Lane Johnson (2013-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 80 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Super Bowl LII Champion


When Chip Kelly took over the Eagles in 2013, most expected him to take his Oregon Duck protege Duo Jordan. When the Dolphins leaped in front of the Eagles and drafted Jordan, Kelly was left with Lane Johnson as the best available player to take. Johnson was expected to be the heir to Jason Peters’ throne, but as Peters refuses to let go of his position, Johnson has had to stay put at right tackle, and that has been just fine. Today Johnson is regarded as the best right tackle in football, and his personality and hate of the Dallas Cowboys has turned him into a fan favorite in Philadelphia. The 2016 season showed just how important Johnson is for the Eagles, as his 10-game suspension led to the team earning a 2-8 record with him out, and 5-1 when he was in the lineup.


57) DE Norm Willey (1950-1957)

Stats as an Eagle: 92 games, 2 INTs, 9 fumble recoveries, 2 TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


Willey played defense, caught passes, and returned kicks for the Eagles in the 1950’s. He spent his entire eight year career in Philadelphia. Sacks weren’t officially tracked back in the days Willey played, but according to the local newspapers of the time, Willey recorded 17 sacks in a single game. The guy he sacked was Giants quarterback Charlie Conerly, who was a Pro Bowler and eventually a Hall of Fame finalist. If true, that is a record that will certainly never be broken in today’s NFL.


56) S Andre Waters (1984-1993)

Stats as an Eagle: 137 games, 15 INTs, 10 fumble recoveries, 910 tackles, 2 TDs

Accolades: Eagles’ 75th Anniversary Team


“Dirty Waters” was one of the meanest and hard-hitting safeties the league has ever seen. He is 19th in franchise history in games played, tied with safety teammate Wes Hopkins and behind only two other safeties (Randy Logan and Brian Dawkins). His 910 tackles are by far the most in team history, 36 more than the next guy up (Seth Joyner). All of those hits are celebrated, but unfortunately those hits likely led to him ending his life, as he committed suicide and was later determined to be suffering from CTE.


55) RB Timmy Brown (1960-1967)

Stats as an Eagle: 96 games, 3,703 rushing yards, 29 rush TDs, 231 receptions, 3,346 receiving yards, 26 rec TDs, 514 punt return yards, 1 PR TD, 4,483 kick return yards, 5 KR TDs; 12,049 all-purpose yards, 62 total TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, NFL Champion (1960), Eagles 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Brown did everything for the Eagles to be able to move down the field: returned kicks, caught passes, and ran the ball. His first year with the Eagles he contributed to the 1960 championship team, defeating his former team in the Vince Lombardi-led Packers. He led the NFL in yards per carry once, twice he led the NFL in yards per touch, and twice he led the NFL in all-purpose yards. Brown also once returned a kick 105 yards for a touchdown; another time he became the first player ever with multiple kick return touchdowns in the same game. He is the current Eagles franchise leader in kick return yards and kick return touchdowns, and he wasn’t too shabby as a running back either as he is 8th in Eagles history in rushing yards.


54) TE/K Bobby Walston (1951-1962)

Stats as an Eagle: 148 games, 311 receptions, 5,363 receiving yards, 46 rec TDs; 80 field goals, 365 PATs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, NFL Champion (1960), NFL’s 1950s All-Decade Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Walston is finally being recognized for his accomplishments in an Eagles uniform, as he will be inducted into the team’s Hall of Fame later this season. It’s rightfully so because not only was he a great pass catcher, but he also helped the team by being their kicker. He never missed a game in his 12-year career in Philadelphia, even playing through a broken jaw. Walston twice lead the NFL in field goal percentage, and his contributions on the field led him to be included on the NFL’s 1950s All-Decade Team. He is second in franchise history in points scored, and he also made the 6th-most field goals in team history. On the receiving side of the ball, he sits 5th in franchise history in receiving yards, 6th in touchdowns, and 11th in receptions.


53) DE Brandon Graham (2010-2018)

Stats as an Eagle: 127 games, 42.5 sacks, 320 tackles, 16 forced fumbles, 4 fumble recoveries, 1 TD

Accolades: Super Bowl LII Champion


What a rollercoaster Graham’s Eagles career has been. When the Eagles used their first-round selection on him in 2010, fans complained that the team didn’t select Earl Thomas instead. The years that followed every time Graham was mentioned, he was reminded that he should have been Earl Thomas instead. He started to head towards bust status when he missed most of the 2011 season and then Chip Kelly wanted to convert him into a linebacker. Now he is a legend in the city of Philadelphia forever after stopping an inevitable Tom Brady last-minute touchdown drive in the Super Bowl with a strip sack. He has now played in the 28th-most games in franchise history, and can possibly move up to 16th-place with a healthy season. His 42.5 sacks are also the 7th-most in franchise history, so I’d say the word “bust” will no longer be close to Graham’s name.


52) S Wes Hopkins (1983-1993)

Stats as an Eagle: 137 games, 30 INTs, 16 fumble recoveries, 12 sacks, 1 TD

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


Hopkins spent his entire 10-year career in an Eagles uniform. He was apart of Buddy Ryan’s ferocious late 1980’s-early 1990’s defense. He is tied with his backfield teammate Andre Waters for the 19th-most games played in franchise history. His 30 interceptions are the 5th-most ever by an Eagle, while his 12 sacks are the 2nd-most by a safety in franchise history, behind only Brian Dawkins’ 21.


51) S Bill Bradley (1969-1976)

Stats as an Eagle: 110 games, 34 INTs, 9 fumble recoveries, 1 TD; 39.0 yards per punt; 953 punt return yards; 564 kick return yards

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Eagles Hall of Famer


Bradley was recognized as one of the best safeties in the NFL in the early 1970’s, earning two All-Pros and three Pro Bowl selections. He had 20 interceptions over the course of two seasons, and his 34 total interceptions are still tied for the most in Eagles history.

50) QB Carson Wentz (2016-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 40 games, 63.7 comp pct, 10,152 passing yards, 70 TDs, 28 INTs, 92.5 passer rating

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, Super Bowl LII Champion


This is not a spot where Carson Wentz is expected to stay at. Just three years into his NFL career, Wentz has shown that he has the ability to play at an elite level at quarterback, as he was close to winning the MVP award in 2017. In volleyball terms, Wentz’s 2017 regular season play was essentially the set to Nick Foles’ spike to help the Eagles earn their first ever Lombardi Trophy. The Eagles are now fully invested into Wentz in the long-term after giving him a contract extension this offseason. Howie Roseman has done all he could to give Wentz everything he needs to lead the Eagles to another Super Bowl, so now we have to sit back and see it if actually happens. Regardless of what happens this season, Wentz has plenty of play ahead of him which will likely put him somewhere in the top 10 of this list when it needs to be redone in another 100 years.


49) LB William Thomas (1991-1999)

Stats as an Eagle: 140 games, 27 INTs, 886 tackles, 37 sacks, 10 forced fumbles, 12 fumble recoveries, 4 TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler


Wille T was a stalwart for the Eagles in the 1990’s, missing only four games in nine seasons. His 140 games in an Eagles uniform are the 2nd-most by a linebacker, behind just Chuck Bednarik. He also just one of three Eagles with 20+ sacks and 15+ interceptions, joined by Seth Joyner and Brian Dawkins.


48) C/LB Alex Wojciechowicz (1946-1950)

Stats as an Eagle: 48 games

Accolades: NFL Champion (1948, 1949), NFL 1940s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Wojciechowicz played in less than 50 games as an Eagle, but the Hall of Famer was an impact player both on offense and on defense. In just five years with the Eagles, he led them to three NFL Championship Games, winning a pair of titles. The Eagles voted him as one of the linebackers on the 75th Anniversary Team in 2007, showing just how highly regarded the franchise views him.


47) OT Stan Walters (1975-1983)

Stats as an Eagle: 127 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Eagles Hall of Famer


Walters started every game at left tackle over his first eight seasons with the team, helping keep Ron Jaworski upright. He made consecutive Pro Bowls in 1978 and 1979, then during the Super Bowl run of 1980 he did not allow a single sack. Only nine offensive lineman have played in more games than Walters did as an Eagle.


46) DT Charlie Johnson (1977-1981)

Stats as an Eagle: 76 games, 4 INTs, 7 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro


During Johnson’s five years as an Eagle, the team’s defense allowed the fewest points in the NFL, averaging just 15.2 per game. They were also third in passer rating allowed, fourth in interceptions, and sixth in completion percentage allowed and sacks. The running defense, which Johnson was a huge part of, allowed the second-fewest touchdowns in the league and third-fewest rushing yards.His stout play allowed the Eagles defense to play well enough to win the NFC and play in Super Bowl XV.


45) QB Sonny Jurgensen (1957-1963)

Stats as an Eagle: 83 games, 54.4 comp pct, 9,639 passing yards, 76 TDs, 73 INTs, 79.1 passer rating

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, 1 All-Pro, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Jurgensen had to take over for Norm Van Brocklin after the 1960 championship season, which was a tough act to follow. Jurgensen passed with flying colors (literally) as he led the NFL in completions and set new league records in passing yards (3,723) and touchdown passes (32).Jurgensen was the starting quarterback for just three seasons, but his impact in those seasons last virtually a lifetime. His team record for passing yards stood 27 years until Randall Cunningham broke it in 1988, while his 32 touchdown passes stood as a team record until Carson Wentz broke it in 2017. He currently has the 10th-most completions, 8th-most passing yards, and 6th-most touchdowns in Eagles history.


44) OT Jon Runyan (2000-2008)

Stats as an Eagle: 144 games

Accolades: 1 Pro Bowler, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team


The Eagles signed Jon Runyan to the richest free agency contract ever for an offensive lineman at the time with a six-year, $30 Million deal. He ended up playing nine total seasons in Philly, never missing a game. He was able to get the best of Hall of Famer Michael Strahan in a few matchups, helping the Eagles win 13 out of 23 meetings with the Giants in the 2000s. He was named to the Eagles’ 75th anniversary team, which speaks to how well he played given the amount of tackle talent the Eagles had in their history. Only four offensive lineman played in more games as an Eagle than Runyan (Jerry Sisemore, Guy Morriss, Tra Thomas, and Chuck Bednarik).


43) C Jim Ringo (1964-1967)

Stats as an Eagle: 56 games

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, Eagles Hall of Fame, Pro Football Hall of Fame


Ringo was traded to the Eagles towards the end of his storied career, but he was still able to be an impact player for the Birds. In four seasons, Ringo started in all 56 games and made the Pro Bowl three times. His efforts in the 1960’s led to him being selected to the NFL’s All-Decade Team.


42) DE Hugh Douglas (1998-2002; 2004)

Stats as an Eagle: 82 games, 54.5 sacks, 6 forced fumbles, 222 tackles, 1 INT

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro


Douglas was one one of the best pass rushers the Eagles have had in their history. His 54.5 sacks still has his in the top-5 in Eagles history. In 2000 he became the first Eagles defensive player to earn a First-Team All-Pro selection since Clyde Simmons in 1992. He left the team for one season in 2003 but returned the following year as a depth player for the Eagles’ 2004 Super Bowl team.


41) TE Keith Jackson (1988-1991)

Stats as an Eagle: 60 games, 242 receptions, 2,756 receiving yards, 20 rec TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 3x All-Pro, NFC Offensive Rookie of Year (1988)


Jackson only played in 60 games for Philadelphia, but his presence was felt. In his first three seasons as an Eagle Jackson was named to three Pro Bowls and three All-Pro teams. Jackson is one of only three offensive players to start their careers with three straight All-Pro selections (Earl Campbell, Barry Sanders). The Eagles were too cheap to want to extend him though, so Jackson skipped town. If he stuck around he’d be regarded possibly as the best tight end in team history.

40) QB Ron Jaworski (1977-1986)

Stats as an Eagle: 142 games, 53.3 comp pct, 26,963 passing yards, 175 TDs, 151 INTs, 74.0 passer rating

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, NFC Player of the Year (1980), Eagles Hall of Famer


In the mid 1970’s the Eagles were in desperate need of a quarterback, because Mike Boryla and Roman Gabriel just weren’t cutting it. They decided to take a risk by trading star tight end Charle Young to the Los Angeles Rams for a relatively unknown guy named Ron Jaworski. The polish rifle went on to start every game over an eight-year span, setting a then NFL record with 116 straight starts. He fully blossomed in 1980, when he was the NFC Offensive Player of the Year and helped lead the Eagles to Super Bowl XV. At the time Jaworski retired, he held the Eagles all-time records for completions, yards, touchdown passes, and wins.


39) RB Wilbert Montgomery (1977-1984)

Stats as an Eagle: 100 games, 6,538 rushing yards, 45 rush TDs, 266 receptions, 2,447 receiving yards, 12 rec TDs; 8,985 scrimmage yards, 57 total TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Eagles Hall of Famer


In his rookie year in 1977, Montgomery didn’t produce much in the running game, but in 1978 he was given the keys to the Eagles’ backfield and he took full advantage. His great play in 1978 and 1979 led to back-to-back Pro Bowl selections. He is most remembered for his play in the 1980 NFC Championship Game against the Dallas Cowboys, when he recorded 194 rushing yards and scored on the second play from scrimmage. At the time of his retirement, he was the Eagles’ all-time leading rusher.


38) QB Tommy Thompson (1941-1950)

Stats as an Eagle: 88 games, 51.8 comp pct, 10,240 passing yards, 90 TDs, 100 INTs, 67.4 passer rating

Accolades: 1 Pro Bowl, 2x NFL Champion (1948, 1949)


The Eagles have four total NFL championships in their franchise history, and Tommy Thompson was a part of 50% of them. He was considered the best quarterback in the league for three straight seasons, leading the NFL in touchdown percentage in 1947, 1948, and 1949. He also contributed often on defense, recording 12 interceptions as a safety. Thompson is one of only two NFL quarterbacks to win multiple championships and not be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


37) TE Zach Ertz (2013-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 91 games, 437 receptions, 4,827 receiving yards, 29 rec TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Super Bowl LII Champion


Remember when year after year Eagles fans kept saying “this is the year Zach Ertz breaks out” but then it kept on not happening? Well 2017 changed that for Ertz. Before 2017 the most touchdowns he had in a season was four - in 2018 he scored eight touchdowns. It didn’t stop there. In the playoffs Ertz didn’t hide from the pressure, as he ended up recording 18 receptions and scored the game-winning touchdown of Super Bowl LII. 2018 was an even better year statistically for Ertz, as he broke the NFL record for most receptions by a tight end. He currently has the 9th-most receiving yards in Eagles history, and with another Pro Bowl caliber season he will jump into the top five in franchise history. He also currently has the 3rd-most receptions, and will jump up to 2nd-most at some point in 2019. Ertz is already an Eagles legend for what he did these past two seasons, but the scary thing is he is just hitting the prime of his career.


36) K David Akers (1999-2010)

Stats as an Eagle: 188 games, 294 field goals (82.4% made), 441 extra points (98.7%), 1,323 points

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Akers is unequivocally the greatest kicker in Eagles history. He spent 12 seasons in Philadelphia, making Pro Bowl teams in five of those years. Akers holds the franchise record for games played. He also has the most field goals made in Eagles history, making over 200(!!!!) more field goals than the guy with the 2nd-most made kicks. He was named to the NFL’s All-Decade Team for the 2000’s and holds the league record for most points scored in a calendar decade with 1,169 in that 2000’s decade.


35) WR DeSean Jackson (2008-2013; present)

Stats as an Eagle: 87 games, 356 receptions, 6,117 receiving yards, 32 rec TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler


There was a lot of hype surrounding the draft selection of DeSean Jackson. The Eagles were set to finally have their electrifying wide receiver that Donovan McNabb desperately needed. He was all of that and more in his first six years in Philadelphia. Jackson has the 4th-most receiving yards, 9th-most receptions, 9th-most receiving touchdowns, 2nd-most punt return yards, and the most punt return touchdowns in Eagles history. His most memorable play in an Eagles uniform was that legendary punt return touchdown to complete one of the greatest comebacks in NFL history. He was set to become probably the greatest Eagles receiver of all-time, until Chip Kelly told him to scram. Now in 2019 he is back in the place his heart belongs to, and is ready to try and earn his first Super Bowl victory, while still climbing up the Eagles’ all-time leaders list.


34) OT Tra Thomas (1998-2008)

Stats as an Eagle: 166 games

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team


Thomas helped keep Donovan McNabb upright and lead the Eagles offense to success in the early 2000’s. He was a part of Eagles teams that won a combined 10 games during his tenure, and was selected to three Pro Bowls for his efforts. Back during the Eagles’ 75th anniversary, team selectors decided that Thomas was one of the best tackles in franchise history. His 166 games in an Eagles uniform are the 6th-most in franchise history.


33) LB Jeremiah Trotter (1998-2001; 2004-2006; 2009)

Stats as an Eagle:116 games, 692 tackles, 7 INTs, 11 sacks, 9 forced fumbles, 2 fumble recoveries, 2 TDs

Accolades: 4x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Eagles Hall of Famer


The Axe Man was one of the scariest defenders in Eagles history. He had the passion of Brian Dawkins and the hard hitting abilities of Andre Waters. From 1999-2001, Trotter lead the Eagles in tackles. His 564 solo tackles and unofficially the 8th-most in franchise history. Thanks to three different stints with the team, only five linebackers in Eagles history have played in more games than Trotter.


32) OT Jerry Sisemore (1973-1984)

Stats as an Eagle: 156 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Philadelphia Eagles Hall of Famer


Sisemore was a beast on the right side of the Eagles offensive line in the 1970’s and 1980’s, playing both right tackle and right guard. At one point in his 12-year career with the Eagles, he started 127 consecutive games on the offensive line. His 156 total games are the 4th-most by a lineman in franchise history, and the 10th-most overall.


31) DE Trent Cole (2005-2014)

Stats as an Eagle: 155 games, 85.5 sacks, 569 tackles, 19 forced fumbles, 3 fumble recoveries, 1 INT, 1 TD

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler


Fun Fact: The Redskins traded a 5th round draft pick in 2005 to the Eagles to bring receiver James Thrash back to Washington. The Eagles used that pick to select Trent Cole. All Cole did in Philadelphia was hit quarterbacks. The league started tracking QB hits in 2006, and Cole is unofficially the Eagles’ franchise leader in hits with 149. His 85.5 sacks are the 2nd-most in Eagles history.

30) RB Brian Westbrook (2002-2009)

Stats as an Eagle: 107 games, 5,995 rushing yards, 37 rush TDs, 426 receptions, 3,790 receiving yards, 29 rec TDs; 9,785 scrimmage yards, 68 total TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


The Eagles got a lot more out of their 3rd round pick of the 2002 Draft that they ever could have imagined. Westbrook contributed in the running game, the passing game, and return game. His punt return touchdown against the Giants was the original punt return miracle against the Giants before DeSean Jackson had his return a few years later. Due to the fact that the Eagles in the mid-2000’s had jack squat at wide receiver, Westbrook become the team’s best receiver. In fact, his 90 receptions in 2007 were the most in team history up until Zach Ertz broke the record in 2018. He currently has the 3rd-most rushing yards, 4th-most rushing touchdowns, 4th-most receptions, 14th-most receiving yards, and 14th-most receiving touchdowns in Eagles history. His one last parting gift before leaving the Eagles was helping teach LeSean McCoy everything he knew, which set the Eagles’ running game up for the following five plus years.


29) OG/DT Bucko Kilroy (1943-1955)

Stats as an Eagle: 134 games, 11 fumble recoveries, 5 INTs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 2x NFL Champion (1948, 1949), NFL 1940s All-Decade Team


Kilroy is the greatest Eagle you’ve probably never heard of. He joined the Eagles just 10 years after their inception into the league, and spent his entire 13 year football career in Philadelphia. He played guard and tackle on offense, then “middle guard” on defense. He was much more remembered for his play on offense, as he helped blocked for Steve Van Buren in the 1949 and 1949 NFL Championship games, helping the team win back-to-back championships.


28) LB Maxie Baughan (1960-1965)

Stats as an Eagle: 80 games, 7 INTs, 5 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, NFL Champion (1960), Eagles Hall of Famer


In his first season as a professional, Baughan intercepted three passes and helped the Eagles win the 1960 NFL Championship. He made five Pro Bowls in his six years with the team, before being abruptly traded away. The only linebacker to this day to make more Pro Bowls than Baughan did was Chuck Bednarik.


27) DT Jerome Brown (1987-1991)

Stats as an Eagle: 76 games, 29.5 sacks, 10 fumble recoveries, 3 INTs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Oh what could have been. Brown teamed up with Reggie White to create the most dynamic and terrifying defensive line in the NFL. The Eagles team as a whole was on its way to greatness, before Brown made a poor choice by driving too fast in his Corvette and losing control before crashing, killing both him and his 12-year-old nephew. Brown was named a First-Team All-Pro in both 1990 and 1991, which makes him one of only two Eagles defensive players in history to earn two 1st team All-Pro selections by the age of 26. His 29.5 sacks are the 5th-most by an interior defensive lineman in franchise history.


26) S Malcolm Jenkins (2014-2018)

Stats as an Eagle: 80 games, 11 INTs, 418 tackles, 8 forced fumbles, 5 fumble recoveries, 3 sacks, 4 TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, Super Bowl LII Champion


When the Eagles first signed Malcolm Jenkins in free agency, a majority of fans were disgruntled with the singing because they wanted the team to go after the highly touted Jairus Byrd instead. Boy were we wrong about that. Jenkins has essentially been the closest thing to Brian Dawkins the Eagles could have hoped for: he is the unquestioned leader of the defense, he has never missed a game in his five seasons with the team, and he came up big in the postseason when the world was watching (some people still say Brandin Cooks is dead to this day from the hit he took from Jenkins in the Super Bowl). This ranking might be a little too high, but at the same his leadership abilities are what helped bring the Eagles their first Super Bowl title.


25) C Jason Kelce (2011-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 110 games

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro, Super Bowl LII Champion


2011 was supposed to be a great draft class for the Eagles. They had 11 picks, so surely they had to have gotten a few talented players from those picks, right? Well, pretty much the entire draft class was a flop. However, at first it looked like they may have gotten a steal with Jason Kelce in the 6th round. Since then, Kelce has been one of the most dominate centers in the entire NFL. It took a long time for him to get the national recognition, but he finally has that after being named 1st team All-Pro in both 2017 and 2018. Perhaps it was that Super Bowl parade speech that got him the attention he deserved. Kelce has been a fan favorite for a long time, and speech on the Art Museum steps furthered etched his legacy as one of the best centers in the team’s history.


24) LB Bill Bergey (1974-1980)

Stats as an Eagle: 91 games, 18 INTs, 15 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 4x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro, Eagles Hall of Famer


In 1974 the Eagles were in need of a linebacker, and were willingly to give up a lot to get one. They were able to land Bill Bergey in a trade with the Cincinnati Bengals, but had to give up two 1st round picks and a 2nd round pick. Bergey made the trade worth it, almost immediately - he picked up 18 tackles and forced a fumble that resulted in a 96 yard touchdown for the Eagles in his debut. In his Eagles career he was selected to four Pro Bowl and selected 1st team All-Pro twice. He was the heart of the Eagles defense in the mid-to-late 1970’s.


23) DT Fletcher Cox (2012-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 109 games, 44.5 sacks, 330 tackles, 8 forced fumbles, 10 fumble recoveries, 2 TDs

Accolades: 4x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Super Bowl LII Champion


The 2012 NFL Draft is considered to be one of the best Eagles’ draft classes in the 21st century. That is mostly because the class was led by Fletcher Cox being selected with the 12th overall pick by the Birds. It took him a few years to get to where he wanted to be thanks to scheme changes put in place by Chip Kelly, but now Fletcher Cox is considered by all fans and media across the league as the 2nd-best defensive tackle in the NFL (behind just Aaron Donald). Cox finally started getting recognition in 2015, which started his first of four straight Pro Bowl selections. Cox has been terrorizing quarterbacks his entire career, hitting quarterbacks 111 times so far in his career. QB hits have been recorded officially since 2006, and he has the 2nd-most of any Eagle in that time (Trent Cole has 149). Cox’s 44.5 career sacks are the 6th-most in Eagles history, but he has the most of any interior defensive lineman. After helping the team earn their first Super Bowl ring in history, Cox skyrocketed up the charts of the best Eagles ever to wear the uniform, and it looks like he’ll be staying here quite a while to add to his legacy.


22) QB Norm Van Brocklin (1958-1960)

Stats as an Eagle: 36 games, 54.3 comp pct, 7,497 passing yards, 55 TDs, 51 INTs, 75.7 passer rating

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, NFL MVP (1960), NFL Champion (1960), Eagles Hall of Famer, NFL Hall of Famer


Van Brocklin started just 36 games at quarterback for the Eagles, but made a lasting impression. He made the Pro Bowl in all three seasons as an Eagle, led the league in game-winning drives twice, and then won the NFL MVP award in 1960. In the team’s NFL Championship appearance in 1960 against the Vince Lombardi-led Green Bay Packers, Van Brocklin threw for 204 yards and led a fourth-quarter comeback to give the Eagles a 17-13 win. It’s the only time ever a team beat Vince Lombardi’s Packers in the playoffs. That’s something only a legend could do, and that’s exactly what Van Brocklin is in Philadelphia.


21) CB Tom Brookshier (1953-1961)

Stats as an Eagle: 76 games, 20 INTs, 8 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, NFL Champion (1960), Eagles Hall of Famer


Brookshier only had a seven-year career thanks to a brief two-year stint in the Air Force, but when he was on the field he was a playmaker for the Eagles. His rookie year he collected eight interceptions, and went on to grab 12 more interceptions over the rest of his career. He was recognized with back-to-back Pro Bowl nominations in 1959 and 1960, and his great defense in 1960 is what helped put the Eagles over the edge and beat the Packers to win the NFL Championship.

20) OT Bob Brown (1964-1968)

Stats as an Eagle: 64 games

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 3x All-Pro, NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Brown was arguably the best offensive lineman in the NFL when he was on the Eagles. In fact, that consideration was backed up when he made the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1960’s. He was named 1st team All-Pro and a Pro Bowler in three out of the five seasons he was on the Eagles.


19) DE Clyde Simmons (1986-1993)

Stats as an Eagle: 124 games, 76 sacks, 720 tackles, 12 forced fumbles, 10 fumble recoveries, 3 TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Back in the late 1980’s-early 1990’s, opposing offenses had to worry about Reggie White and Jerome Brown. Because so much attention had to be dedicated to them, it allowed Clyde Simmons to truly flourish. He never missed a game in his eight years in Philadelphia, and his 76 sacks in an Eagles uniform are he 3rd-most in Eagles history. Simmons still shares the franchise record for sacks in a game with 4.5 sacks. 18) RB LeSean McCoy (2009-2014)

Stats as an Eagle: 90 games, 6,792 rushing yards, 44 rush TDs, 300 receptions, 2,282 receiving yards, 10 rec TDs; 9,074 scrimmage yards, 54 total TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro


The Eagles new they needed a successor to Brian Westbrook in the backfield, and they got exactly what they needed when they selected LeSean McCoy in the 2nd round of the 2009 NFL Draft. When given the reigns of the backfield, McCoy made moves that had fans reminiscing of Barry Sanders. His jukes were second to none and probably really did hurt some ankles in the process. He was able to score the 3rd-most rushing touchdowns in franchise history, and is still the franchise’s rushing yards leader. Once again you can thank Chip Kelly for ending McCoy’s tenure in Philadelphia too soon.


17) WR Mike Quick (1982-1990)

Stats as an Eagle: 101 games, 363 receptions, 6,464 receiving yards, 61 rec TDs

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro, Eagles Hall of Famer


One of the original deep threats for the Eagles, Quick had a fantastic career in Philadelphia, spending his entire nine professional years in the City of Brotherly Love. He was a 1st team All-Pro by his 2nd season, and lead the NFL in receiving yards in 1983. Quick currently stands 8th in franchise history in receptions, 3rd in receiving yards, and 3rd in touchdowns. He is the only player ever to catch a 99-yard touchdown pass in overtime.


16) CB Troy Vincent (1996-2003)

Stats as an Eagle: 118 games, 28 INTs, 516 tackles, 6 fumble recoveries, 10 forced fumbles, 4.5 sacks, 1 TD

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, NFL Man of the Year (2002), Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Troy Vincent remains one of the greatest Free Agent signings in franchise history. In 1999, he earned his first of five Pro Bowl selections after leading the NFL with seven interceptions. His 28 total interceptions in an Eagles uniform are the 7th-most in franchise history. His play along with teammates Bobby Taylor and Brian Dawkins helped the Eagles have one of the best secondaries in the entire league throughout their tenure.


15) QB Randall Cunningham (1985-1995)

Stats as an Eagle: 122 games, 55.7 comp pct, 22,877 passing yards, 150 TDs, 105 INTs, 78.7 passer rating; 4,482 rushing yards, 32 rush TDs

Accolades: 3x Pro Bowler, NFL MVP (1990), NFL Comeback Player of Year (1992), Eagles Hall of Famer


The Ultimate Weapon was a freak of nature. Cunningham introduced himself to the world during a Monday Night Football game in 1988, when he literally bounced off of the Giants’ Carl Banks would-be sack and then threw a touchdown. That play essentially helped launch him into superstardom, as he continued great play led him to be picked as NFL MVP in 1990 (Cunningham is still the only Eagles player in the Super Bowl era to win NFL MVP). Not only was Cunningham a great passer, he was also a great rusher (lead team in rushing yards from 1987-1990) and a great punter (had a 91 yards punt). In the rushing category, Cunningham still sits with the 6th-most rushing yards and 5th-most rushing touchdown in team history. In the passing category, his sits with the 3rd-most passing yards, 3rd-most completions, and 3rd-most touchdowns. If he a head coach that focused more on protecting his quarterback and in the offense in general instead of Buddy Ryan, the Eagles likely boise a Lombardi Trophy or two with Cunningham under center.


14) LB Seth Joyner (1986-1993)

Stats as an Eagle: 120 games, 37 sacks, 875 tackles, 17 INTs, 21 forced fumbles, 8 fumble recoveries, 5 TDs

Accolades: 2x Pro Bowler, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Nobody on offense wanted to cross the field where Seth Joyner was in the 1980’s and 1990’s. He was exactly what you want out of your linebacker: someone who hits people and makes plays on the ball. Joyner unofficially has the 2nd-most tackles, 2nd-most forced fumbles, 24th-most interceptions, and 9th-most sacks in franchise history. He finally got recognized by being inducted into the Eagles Hall of Fame in 2018, and now he just has to wait to eventually get inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


13) CB Eric Allen (1988-1994)

Stats as an Eagle: 111 games, 34 INTs, 408 tackles, 4 forced fumbles, 5 fumble recoveries, 2 sacks, 5 TDs

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


There isn’t really much debate when asked who the greatest cornerback in Eagles history is — it’s Eric Allen. Allen missed just one game in his seven seasons with the Eagles. He is tied for the most interceptions in Eagles history, and he’s in sole possession for most interception return touchdowns with five (four of them coming in one season). He is in the Eagles Hall of Fame, but for some reason has yet to be placed into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, which is an absolute travesty.


12) WR Harold Carmichael (1971-1983)

Stats as an Eagle: 180 games, 589 receptions, 8,978 receiving yards, 79 rec TDs

Accolades: 4x Pro Bowler, NFL 1970s All-Decade Team, NFL Man of the Year (1980), Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


Carmichael was the original redzone threat. Originally a tight end, he was moved to wide receiver, which is when he really began to flourish. He led the league in both receptions (79) and receiving yards (1,116) in his first full season as a starter. He was such a treat in the passing game, that he eventually set a league record with a catch in 127 consecutive games (which has since been beat). Carmichael retired as the Eagles’ all-time leader in receptions, receiving yards, and receiving touchdowns, and still holds each of those records today.


11) OT Jason Peters (2009-present)

Stats as an Eagle: 127 games

Accolades: 7x Pro Bowler, 2x All-Pro


Andy Reid trading for Jason Peters is still probably the greatest trade in Eagles history. Since becoming an Eagle, Peters has been named to seven Pro Bowls and was 1st team All-Pro twice. His 127 games played in an Eagles uniform are tied for the 28th-most in franchise history, and if he plays in all 16 games in 2019, he’ll jump up to 16th. Peters is a warrior, coming back from a double achilles tear in 2012 and a torn ACL in 2017. Not only has Peters been a great player on the field, but he’s been almost better off the field. When he torn his ACL in 2017, while on the cart leaving Lincoln Financial Field, Peters coached up his replacement Halapoulivaati Vaitai. He continued being essentially a coach on the sideline throughout the Super Bowl run. Now he has taken his eventual successor Andre Dillard under his wing and making sure Dillard learns everything he has learned in the NFL.

10) QB Donovan McNabb (1999-2009)

Stats as an Eagle: 148 games, 59.0 comp pct, 37,276 passing yards, 216 TDs, 100 INTs, 86.5 passer rating; 3,249 rushing yards, 28 rush TDs

Accolades: 6x Pro Bowler, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


When McNabb was selected with the 2nd overall pick in the 1999 NFL Draft, he was greeted with boos from Eagles fans in the crowd. McNabb made sure every single one of those fans ate crow, as he blossomed into an elite quarterback in the 2000’s. Because McNabb was so talented the team figured he didn’t really need great receivers, but even with the terrible receivers he was throwing to he still made six Pro Bowls in his career. When Terrell Owens was brought in, the McNabb-Owens connection became the most dangerous in the NFL, coming just shy of winning a Super Bowl in their only full year together. With McNabb under center the Eagles won nine playoff games and went to five NFC Championship Games, leading the Eagles through one of the most successful eras in their history. There were plenty of memorable moments McNabb had in Philadelphia, including playing on a broken ankle for a full game and still winning, a 14 second scramble leading to a deep completion, and 4th & 26. McNabb is the Eagles’ all-time leader in all three major passing categories: completions, passing yards and touchdowns. Not only that, but McNabb was clutch, completing 22 game-winning drives, which are also the most in team history.


9) OT/DT Al Wistert (1943-1951)

Stats as an Eagle: 95 games, 8 fumble recoveries, 1 INT

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, 4x All-Pro, 2x NFL Champion (1948, 1949), NFL 1940s All-Decade Team, Eagles Hall of Famer


If it wasn’t for Chuck Bednarik, Wistert would likely be considered the greatest two-way player in Eagles history. Wistert played both offensive tackle and defensive tackle, but is remembered more for his play on the offensive end. He was a First-Team All-Pro four times, and made one Pro Bowl before being voted onto the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1940’s. His play on offense helped the Eagles win back-to-back Championships in 1948 and 1949. It is a mockery that Wistert hasn’t been selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


8) TE Pete Retzlaff (1956-1966)

Stats as an Eagle: 132 games, 452 receptions, 7,412 receiving yards, 47 rec TDs

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, 1x All-Pro, NFL Champion (1960), Eagles Hall of Famer


He lined up in all offensive positions, but Retzlaff is considered one of the original pass-catching tight ends of the NFL. Back when the NFL was still a running league, Retzlaff led the league in receptions in 1959 with 56 caught passes. He has the 2nd-most receptions and receiving yards in Eagles history, while crossing the endzone through the air the 5th-most times. Once again another Eagle that should have been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame but is still being ignored by the committee.


7) WR Tommy McDonald (1957-1963)

Stats as an Eagle: 88 games, 287 receptions, 5,499 receiving yards, 66 rec TDs

Accolades: 5x Pro Bowler, NFL Champion (1960), Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, Pro Football Hall of Famer


It is hard to say who is the best receiver in Eagles history — Harold Carmichael or Tommy McDonald. So let’s just say Carmichael is the greatest tall receiver in Eagles history while McDonald is the greatest short receiver in Eagles history. McDonald stood at 5’9, and you couldn’t measure the toughness he had when he played the game — he once broke his jaw in a game but still played the next week and scored four touchdowns. In just 88 games with the Eagles he scored 66 touchdowns, which are the 2nd-most by a receiver in team history. He led the NFL in receiving touchdowns in multiple seasons, and was clutch when he pulled in a touchdown in the 1960 NFL Championship. To this day McDonald remains the shortest player ever inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


6) TE/DE Pete Pihos (1947-1955)

Stats as an Eagle: 107 games, 373 receptions, 5,619 receiving yards, 61 rec TDs, 1 punt return TD, 2 INTs, 7 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 6x Pro Bowler, 5x All-Pro, 2x NFL Champion (1948, 1949), NFL 1940s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Until Zach Ertz has a few more dominate seasons, Pihos will remain the greatest tight end in Eagles history. Just read the accolades above and you’ll see how much Pihos dominated the NFL in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s. He retired early when he was just 32 years old, and if he hadn’t done that he could have entered into the Greatest Eagle of All-Time discussion. He didn’t retire because he was on the decline; in fact, in his final three seasons in the NFL, he ranked first in receptions, receiving yards and touchdown receptions. Losing him devastated the Eagles, as their offense dropped from #1 in passing offense to #10.


5) RB Steve Van Buren (1944-1951)

Stats as an Eagle: 83 games, 5,860 rushing yards, 69 rush TDs, 3 rec TDs, 2 punt return TDs, 3 kick return TD; 8,958 all-purpose yards, 77 total TDs; 9 INTs, 14 fumble recoveries

Accolades: 5x All-Pro, NFL 1940s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, NFL 75th Anniversary Team, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Even though LeSean McCoy has the rushing record, Van Buren is still considered the greatest running back in Eagles history. Not only was he an Eagles great, but at the time he was considered the greatest running back in the game until Jim Brown entered the league. Van Buren played extraordinary well in the regular season, but he kicked things into high gear when the playoffs would come around. in the 1949 NFL Championship Game, he rushed for 98 yards and the game’s only touchdown in the Eagles’ 7-0 win in a snow storm. In the 1949 NFL Championship Game, he rushed for 196 yards in the Eagles’ 14-0 win. His 69 rushing touchdowns are by far the most in Eagles history, 24 more than the next guy behind him.


4) QB Nick Foles (2012-2014; 2017-2018)

Stats as an Eagle: 40 games, 62.9 comp pct, 8,703 passing yards, 58 TDs, 23 INTs, 93.2 passer rating

Accolades: 1x Pro Bowler, Pro Bowl MVP (2013), Super Bowl LII Champion, Super Bowl LII MVP


Is there a little bit of exaggeration putting Foles this high? Maybe. But remember this: As of the beginning of the 2019 season, Nick Foles is the only quarterback in Eagles history to lead the team to a Super Bowl victory. Before the magical 2017 campaign, Eagles fans in their late 50’s and 60’s had never seen the Eagles win the big game. Foles is the definition of a Philadelphian. He was an underdog long overlooked and never really considered to be great. When he took over for Carson Wentz at the end of the season, nobody (including most Eagles fans) didn’t believe that Foles had it in him to led the Eagles to a playoff win, let alone the Super Bowl. He proved everyone wrong, putting together one of the greatest playoff stretches by a quarterback in NFL history. He picked up where he left off in 2018 when he was able to take back over late in the season and go on a winning streak to get the Eagles in the playoffs again, winning yet another playoff game in the process and was one Alshon Jeffery drop away from most likely playing in back-to-back Super Bowls. Foles has had many record performances in his Eagles career: A record-tying seven touchdown passes in a game, an NFL-record 25 straight completions, a franchise-record 471 passing yards, and an NFL record 27:2 TD:INT ratio in a season. He has won both Pro Bowl MVP and Super Bowl MVP in an Eagles uniform, he also instructed Doug Pederson to call what is now considered the greatest play call in both Eagles history and Super Bowl history. Most probably won’t agree with me, but I believe Nick Foles is the greatest quarterback in Eagles history (until Carson Wentz plays a few more years and possibly brings in a Lombardi Trophy or two).


3) DE Reggie White (1985-1992)

Stats as an Eagle: 121 games, 124 sacks, 794 tackles, 18 forced fumbles, 11 fumble recoveries, 2 INTs, 2 TD

Accolades: 7x Pro Bowler, 6x All-Pro, NFC Defensive Player of Year (1985), NFL Defensive Player of the Year (1987), NFL 1980s All-Decade Team, NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, NFL 75th Anniversary Team, Pro Football Hall of Famer


If Eagles owner Norman Braman doesn’t let White walk away from the team, we wouldn’t be talking about Whit being just the 3rd-greatest Eagle ever, he would undoubtedly be #1. White is in the debate for the greatest defensive player to ever play the game. Even though he was almost always double-teamed, he still recorded 124 sacks in an Eagles uniform. His 124 sacks with the Eagles are by far the most in team history (2nd place Trent Cole has just 85.5). In a strike-shortened season he had accumulated 21 sacks, which was a then-NFL record. Sacks weren’t the only part of his game though, as he is also 4th in Eagles history in forced fumbles. he also get a few interceptions and returned a few fumbles for touchdowns too. The Minister of Defense was the heart of the feared Eagles defense of the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, and the Eagles went downhill once he left. Still, we celebrate White’s accomplishments in Philadelphia, and will always be regarded as an all-time Eagles great, just not the Greatest of All-Time.


2) S Brian Dawkins (1996-2008)

Stats as an Eagle: 183 games, 34 INTs, 898 tackles, 21 sacks, 32 forced fumbles, 16 fumble recoveries, 3 TD

Accolades: 7x Pro Bowler, 4x All-Pro, NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, Pro Football Hall of Famer


Dawkins falls into the same category as Reggie White, in that if Joe Banner didn’t low-ball him he would have stayed in Philadelphia the final three years of his career and possibly be considered the greatest Philadelphia Eagle. There are many Eagles fans who feel he is the best Eagle ever and is the most loved player in the history of the team. I do believe he is the most beloved Eagle, but in my eyes though I think he is the 2nd-best. He was the heart and soul of not only the defense, but the entire Eagles team in the 2000’s. receivers and tight ends were afraid to go over the middle of the field because they knew that Weapon X was lurking. Dawkins generated some of the most bone-crushing hits in NFL history, and his hit on Alge Crumpler in the 2004 NFL Championship Game is still talked about fondly to this day. He is tied for the franchise’s interception record with 34 of them. He was the first NFL player in history to record 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles, and is still the only NFL player to record a sack, force a fumble, intercept a pass, and score a touchdown in the same game. The only knock about Dawkins was that the Eagles teams he was on never won a championship. If the 2004 team would have beaten the Patriots in Super Bowl 39, Dawkins would have been #1 on my list.

1) LB/C Chuck Bednarik (1949-1962)

Stats as an Eagle: 169 games, 20 INTs, 21 fumble recoveries, 1 TD

Accolades: 8x Pro Bowler, 6x All-Pro, 2x NFL Champion (1949, 1960), NFL 1950s All-Decade Team, Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, Eagles Hall of Famer, NFL 75th Anniversary Team, Pro Football Hall of Famer


The GOAT of Philadelphia Eagles football is the local guy, none other than Chuck Bednarik. ‘Concrete Charlie’ was born in Bethlehem, went to Penn for college, played his entire NFL career with the Eagles, and passed away in Richland. So essentially the only time he was out of the state of Pennsylvania was when he played road games. He was the last of the 60-minute men in the NFL, playing both as a center and as a linebacker. He is remembered much more for his play at linebacker, but at the time he was still considered an elite center. As a rookie in 1949 he was part of the Eagles’ Championship team, and following that year he went on to have five consecutive Pro Bowl and 1st team All-Pro selections. He has two famous plays in his career — both in 1960. The first was his big hit on future Hall of Famer Frank Gifford which caused Gifford to miss the rest of that season and the following season. The picture taken of the hit has long been considered to be the greatest football picture of all-time. His 2nd memorable play was in the 1960 NFL Championship game against the Packers, when he hit future Hall of Famer Jim Taylor, then laid on top of him so the Packers offense couldn’t get another play off before time ran out, preserving the Eagles’ 17-13 lead and giving the Eagles another Championship with Bednarik on the roster. The best part in all of this is that the magical 1960 season initially wasn’t supposed to happen for Bednarik. Ken Safarowic, Bednarik’s son in law, told a story that Bednarik retired in 1959, was given a farewell by the Eagles, but then found out after that season that his wife, Emma, was pregnant with the couple’s fifth daughter, Jackie. "Chuck said, ‘We’ve got another mouth to feed,’ and he went back to work," Safarowic said. "That’s how close it was to not having that special 1960 season.” Bednarik played until 1962 then decided he had enough money to retire. He played a part of two Eagles Championship teams (and we know for a fact the Eagles wouldn’t have won in 1960 without him), which is what puts him over Reggie White and Brian Dawkins as the greatest Eagle ever.

138 views

Stay up to date!  

  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Black Twitter Icon
  • Instagram - Black Circle
  • Black YouTube Icon

Philadelphia Eagles Frenzy